Support

Smartphone and Electronics Insurance

Smartphone and Electronics Insurance

No one likes to think of insurance because it conjures up bad thoughts. However, over the years of repairing iDevices, laptops, and game consoles only a handful of customers have been covered by insurance. As with auto, home, and health insurance;  insurance for a smartphone is often thought of as “a waste of money”; until you need it. A broken screen on a laptop or iPhone is actually a hardware repair, but I describe it to customers as a “cosmetic” repair.  It’s something that is often easily repaired with no threat of loss to the device. However, a dip in the pool, a drop in the toliet, or getting ran over; most often results in a non working device.
  This is when having the right coverage can mean a little money, or a whole lot of money. The most common insurance most owners have is thru the cellular service provider (because they earn commissions on the sale). For iPhone owners, they can opt for Apple Care. You may also check with your credit card company as some offer insurance on your purchases. There are also third party companies who offer insurance as well, and the one I recommend over all the others, including service providers and Apple Care, is Squaretrade. They not only cover smartphones, they cover practically everything electronic.  

Like auto, life, and health insurance, a little due diligence is required to make sure your needs are meet within a reasonable cost when shopping for your iPhone or other electronic insurance coverage. Later this week I’ll post some comparisons between the insurance provider, particularly for iPhones since the new iPhone 7 will be released on September 16th.

In the meantime here’s a link you may use to start your own comparisons, and save a little money. Not having insurance is not a big deal until the day your $700 iPhone becomes a paperweight.

https://m.squaretrade.com/m/iphone

Read More

Apple Owns Up to Error 53

Apple Owns Up to Error 53

For the past year some owners have been stumped by an Error 53 when updating their iPhones. Apple had never came out to say exactly why this error occurs, until about a week ago. Initially they were claiming it was related to a security feature with the Touch ID or home button. This feature renders the iPhone locked, or commonly referred to as “bricked”, but essentially useless. Finally, after several users complaints, and a Class Action Lawsuit being filed. Just today, Feb 18, Apple released a patch to iOS 9.2.1.

If you have and iPhone affected by the Error 53, you should be able to recover from it by plugging your iPhone into your computer and iTunes will download the patch; this is not a full iOS update. Then follow the steps given by iTunes. So far, I have had a 100% recovery with the stack of iPhone 6 and 6Plus’s from my customers who had brought them to me for help. I will be notifying those customers to come pick up their iPhone once the other repairs have been completed.

 

Read More

Get Ready for Another Windows

Get Ready for Another Windows

As we are getting ready for a round of snow, the (Tech) world is getting ready for something else – and it will affect you. Today (Wed, Jan 21, 2015) Microsoft will be showcasing Windows 10. Yes, Windows 10, not 9, but 7, 8, 10. From what I’ve read to date, users of Windows 8.1 will be able to upgrade at no cost. However, you’ll have to wait until the official release, rumoured to be later this year.
In addition to several new promising features, the biggest news will appease my current customers using Win 8, 8.1, the start button will make a come back.
As a member of the Windows Insiders Program, I’ll be installing and begin using the Technical Preview of Windows 10 (i.e beta) this weekend. Over the next few months I’ll post more info I think my clients and customers find worth knowing.

IMG_0751.JPG

Read More

National Consumer Protection Week

Looking to protect yourself from fraud, identity theft, and scams? Maybe you’re wondering about the best way to use credit, how to shop for a used car, or maximize your security online. MaxM Technology has information for you during this week of National Consumer Protection Week, which takes place the first full week of March each year. During the next week we will be posting information to help keep you, our customers, informed and aware so you can protect yourself. So get involved and share this info with you family and friends, its easier to prevent scams and frauds, than to repair damage to your identity, credit, or your banking account.  You may also visit www.ncpw.gov for more information about free educational resources and to read blog posts from national consumer protection experts.  

Read More

Ring, Ring Its Not Microsoft Calling

Ring, Ring Its Not Microsoft Calling

This scam has been going on for several years. I have had three clients this past week call stating they have received this call, and in fact yesterday I received the call.

Scammers use publicly available phone directories and the names associated with those numbers, so it seems they do a geographical area attack. They call their target posing as a Microsoft Tech Support employee then ask to speak to the owner of the computer. Often to help garner your trust they will use the name associated with the phone number, and start the call off cordial. Then they go into the pitch of why they are are calling: your computer is infected, has been hacked, or your computer has been reported to have other issues.

Next they direct you to a website and ask you to click on a link, at that point remote software is installed on your computer which gives them complete access and control to your computer. Remember these guys are scammers, this is how they make their living, so they will talk to you as they go through your system showing you logs that are really in the computer, but they will try to convince you that these are errors. During clean ups after these type of calls, I have often found fake logs and reports which they downloaded to help convince you that your computer has a problem.

At this point they pretend to be fixing your computer as they start looking for any type of financial records, document with passwords, or something to give them further access to your information. In some cases they have installed keyloggers which is software that records your keyboard entries and that information is uploaded to a predesignated site which they then have every word you’ve entered into your computer. This is another way they get your usernames and passwords or other information to gain access to your other accounts.

Once they are finished they will ask for your credit card information and bill your card for their “services” which I have seen from $60 to $250 depending on what they offer to sell you. Oh, and now guess what, they have your credit card info.

What To Do
When they call the number will show as private if you happen to answer the call, just hang up. They will often call back a couple more times and attempt to get you on the phone just ignore it, they will move on to another number.
Have you ever received this call? If so leave a comment and share it to help others.

Read More

Critical: Adobe Flash Update

Critical: Adobe Flash Update

Adobe has released an out of cycle update for their Flash Player. A recently discovered vulnerability in the software allows malicious code to be injected and give remote access to the sender.

Users of Google Chrome will have the update applied automatically the next time the program is opened and connected to the Internet. The same is true for users with Internet Explorer 10 and above.

If you are not sure which you have just open you browser and type in the URL bar www.adobe.com. Then go to the right look for a tab labeled “download, then click “Flash Player”. Follow the onscreen instructions. If your browser has already updated itself, it will notify you.  I would also recommend updating your “Adobe Reader”, and “Adobe Air” programs from the same download tab.

Read More